When your marketing is aligned, it feels like sales come easily. When marketing is off, business is difficult, we are always trying to chase another customer in order to stay ahead of the tax man and the bill collector.

If your marketing is going great, you have probably succeeded at these three goals. If your marketing and sales are aligned like the leaning tower of Pisa , miraculously keeping your business afloat and you have no idea why, you might need to look at these goals a little more closely. On the other hand, if your marketing and sales pipeline is as dry as the Sahara in July, you really need to consider these three fundamental marketing goals.

Audience Building

To start a business, you need one customer. To start marketing, you need an audience. Have you defined who you are speaking to? The temptation for many marketers and business owners is to speak to ourselves, and this will only get you so far. You have an audience, and they might not interact with your brand in the same way you do.

Set a goal that you will discover your audience and build it. The right 10 customers can be the difference between profit and bankruptcy. When you are defining  this SMART goal, you need to ask who can benefit from your service, product, and knowledge. Then you need to identify the size of that audience and how you will be able to reach them in a measurable timeframe.

Brand Identity

Brand identity, what makes you you, is as important as audience building if for the sole reason that you cannot connect with an audience if you are a nonentity. What makes your business unique? The more of a generalist you are, the more difficult this can be.

If you do not have a clear differentiated identity (something different from others), then take the time to think about your audience and how you can focus your identity in a way that connects with them. What do you provide in this specific segment of the market that is unique? How can you build that as an identity?

Improved Distribution

Finally, you need to constantly set, measure, and improve your distribution systems. What does it cost to acquire a customer? What does it cost to deliver products, services, and knowledge to that customer? If you do not have these numbers, that is your first goal: get the numbers.

Once you have an understanding of your distribution channels and costs, then you keep measuring and set goals to improve them.

Over To You

Now, what goals do you find most valuable in your business? What questions do you have about marketing, business, or sales? Leave me a comment below so that I can know how to better serve you.